2018 Census of Population and Dwellings - Individual Variables (Published)

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2018 Census of Population and Dwellings - Individual Variables (Published)

The 'dependent young person indicator' is a derived classification. It identifies the dependency status of individuals who are children in a family nucleus. 'Indicator' means that the classification should be applied to individuals.

The 'dependent young person indicator' indicates whether an individual is a 'dependent young person', a 'dependent child under 18 or a non-dependent child', or a 'child of unknown dependency status'.

A dependent young person is a ‘child in a family nucleus’ aged 18–24 years and not employed full time.

For classification see Aria.

Sources of personal income identifies all the various sources from which a person aged 15 years and over received income in the 12 months ending 6 March 2018.

In the census it is generally only realistic to collect information on money income. This is income that a person can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one’s labour, entrepreneurial skills, and assets; and from transfers received. So, the concept of money income relies on identifying its sources.

Excluded are income in kind, unrealised income, and contingent income (contingent income depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example, to sue). Excluded also is money received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings, and receiving repayments of loan principal; and tax credits and reimbursements of expenses.

The sources of income are also available for each separate field in the classification eg as a 'yes' or 'no' response to 'Wages, salary, commissions, bonuses etc paid by my employer'.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Sources of personal income identifies all the various sources from which a person aged 15 years and over received income in the 12 months ending 6 March 2018.

In the census it is generally only realistic to collect information on money income. This is income that a person can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one’s labour, entrepreneurial skills, and assets; and from transfers received. So, the concept of money income relies on identifying its sources.

Excluded are income in kind, unrealised income, and contingent income (contingent income depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example, to sue). Excluded also is money received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings, and receiving repayments of loan principal; and tax credits and reimbursements of expenses.

For classification see Aria.

Sources of personal income identifies all the various sources from which a person aged 15 years and over received income in the 12 months ending 6 March 2018.

In the census it is generally only realistic to collect information on money income. This is income that a person can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one’s labour, entrepreneurial skills, and assets; and from transfers received. So, the concept of money income relies on identifying its sources.

Excluded are income in kind, unrealised income, and contingent income (contingent income depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example, to sue). Excluded also is money received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings, and receiving repayments of loan principal; and tax credits and reimbursements of expenses.

For classification see Aria.

Total personal income received is the total before-tax income of a person in the 12 months ended 31 March 2018. The information is collected as income bands rather than in actual dollars. Personal income can be combined with other income information from the same family/household to provide:

  • combined parental income for couples with child(ren)
  • grouped combined parental income for couples with child(ren)
  • total family income
  • total household income.

See the ‘Grouped personal income’ definition in Individual definitions; and the ‘Income bands’ definition in General definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Grouped personal income combines the total personal income categories into broader income categories. This allows more information to be released for small geographic areas and population groups.

See the ‘Total personal income’ definition in Individual definitions; the ‘Total household income’ definition in Household definitions; the ‘Statistical Areas’ definition in Geographic definitions; and the ‘Income bands’ definition in General definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Status in employment classifies employed people aged 15 years and over according to whether they were working for themselves or for other people in their main job.

Employed people are categorised into one of the following:

  • paid employee
  • employer
  • self-employed and without employees
  • unpaid family worker.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

An occupation is a set of jobs that require the performance of similar or identical sets of tasks by employed people aged 15 years and over.

See the ‘Job’ definition in Individual definitions.

For full classification with levels 1-5 see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Industry is the type of activity undertaken by the organisation, enterprise, business, or unit of economic activity that employs one or more people aged 15 years and over.

For full classification with levels 1-4 see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

The sector of ownership identifies the part of the economy that owns an organisation, enterprise, business, or unit of economic activity. Examples are central or local government, or private ownership.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Work and labour force status classifies a person aged 15 years and over by their inclusion in or exclusion from the labour force. For an employed person, it distinguishes between full-time employment (30 hours or more per week) or part-time employment (fewer than 30 hours per week). A person who was not employed is classified as either ‘unemployed’ or ‘not in the labour force’.

Note that the definitions of ‘employed’, ‘unemployed’, and ‘not in the labour force’ are based on those of the International Labour Organization, as set down at the 13th International Conference of Labour Statisticians, 1982.

See the ‘Employed’, ‘Unemployed’, and ‘Not in the labour force’ definitions in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

The category for '2018 Census' indicates where we had a 2018 Census response, the other categories indicate where alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for were used.

For classification see Aria.

Hours worked in employment is the total number of hours usually worked in employment each week by a person aged 15 years and over who:

  • worked one hour or more for pay, profit, or payment in kind in a job, business, farm, or professional practice, or
  • worked one hour or more without pay in work that contributed directly to the operation of a business, farm, or professional practice operated by a relative, or
  • had a job or business they were temporarily absent from.

See the ‘Employed’ and ‘Labour force status’ definitions in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Hours worked in employment is the total number of hours usually worked in employment each week by a person aged 15 years and over who:

  • worked one hour or more for pay, profit, or payment in kind in a job, business, farm, or professional practice, or
  • worked one hour or more without pay in work that contributed directly to the operation of a business, farm, or professional practice operated by a relative, or
  • had a job or business they were temporarily absent from.

See the ‘Employed’ and ‘Labour force status’ definitions in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Hours worked in employment is the total number of hours usually worked in employment each week by a person aged 15 years and over who:

  • worked one hour or more for pay, profit, or payment in kind in a job, business, farm, or professional practice, or
  • worked one hour or more without pay in work that contributed directly to the operation of a business, farm, or professional practice operated by a relative, or
  • had a job or business they were temporarily absent from.

See the ‘Employed’ and ‘Labour force status’ definitions in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Main means of travel to work is the usual method by which an employed person aged 15 years and over used to travel the longest distance to their place of employment (for example, by bicycle, public bus, walking, or driving).

‘Usual’ is the type of transport used most often – for example, the one used for the greatest number of days each week, month, or year. If there are two (or more) forms of transport used equally as often, the most recent form of transport was recorded.

‘Main’ is the type of transport used for the component of the journey that covers the longest distance.

Note: the 'did not go to work today' category was not collected as part of the travel to work question in the 2018 Census, but is included in the classification to allow time series comparisons.

See the ‘Workplace’ definition in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Job search methods are all the methods used by a person aged 15 years and over to look for paid work in the four weeks before the census. They include:

  • looking at job advertisements
  • writing, phoning, sending email, or applying in person to an employer
  • contacting Work and Income New Zealand to look for a job
  • contacting friends or relatives for help in finding a job
  • contacting a career adviser or a vocational guidance officer
  • other methods that might result in finding a job, for example:
    • contacting a private employment agency
    • placing advertisements to find a job
    • taking steps to set up a business.

The job search methods are also available for each separate field in the classification eg as a 'yes' or 'no' response to 'Contacted Work and Income to Look for a Job'.

See the ‘Actively seeking work’ definition in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

Job search methods are all the methods used by a person aged 15 years and over to look for paid work in the four weeks before the census. They include:

  • looking at job advertisements
  • writing, phoning, sending email, or applying in person to an employer
  • contacting Work and Income New Zealand to look for a job
  • contacting friends or relatives for help in finding a job
  • contacting a career adviser or a vocational guidance officer
  • other methods that might result in finding a job, for example:
    • contacting a private employment agency
    • placing advertisements to find a job
    • taking steps to set up a business.

See the ‘Actively seeking work’ definition in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

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