Te Kupenga 2018 - 2018 Census individual characteristics variables (Published)

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Te Kupenga 2018 - 2018 Census individual characteristics variables (Published)

Te Kupenga response ID

Survey start time

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Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

For classification see Aria.

A person is regarded as disabled if they have ‘a lot of difficulty’ or ‘cannot do at all’ one or more of the six activities in the Activity limitations questions. These six questions are the Washington Group Short Set of questions on Disability and are referred to as Activity limitations in the 2018 Census.

The questions ask whether people have difficulty performing any of six basic universal activities (walking, seeing, hearing, cognition, self-care, and communication) and were designed for use with the general population. The questions were not designed to measure all domains of functioning with which people may have difficulty, but rather those domains that are likely to identify a majority of people at risk of participation restrictions.

Disability status is derived from six activity questions:

  • difficulty seeing
  • difficulty hearing
  • difficulty walking or climbing steps
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating
  • difficulty washing all over or dressing
  • difficulty communicating.

The questions were designed to allow comparisons to be made between average outcomes for disabled and non-disabled populations. They were not designed to identify the disabled population.

This is a new variable in the 2018 Census.

For classification see Aria.

Status in employment classifies employed people aged 15 years and over according to whether they were working for themselves or for other people in their main job.

Employed people are categorised into one of the following:

  • paid employee
  • employer
  • self-employed and without employees
  • unpaid family worker.

For classification see Aria.

The 'Individual's role in family nucleus' is a derived variable that indicates people's status in relation to the family nucleus to which they belong. The variable can be cross-tabulated with a number of other family variables, as well as demographic variables such as sex, age, and ethnicity.

A family nucleus comprises a couple with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) whose usual residence is in the same household; the children do not have partners or children of their own living in that household.

Included are people who were absent on census night but usually live in a particular dwelling and are members of a family nucleus in that dwelling, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form or the household summary page.

See also ‘Absentee’, ‘Usual residents’, and ‘Usual residents in private dwellings’ in Individual definitions.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Highest qualification is derived for people aged 15 years and over and combines highest secondary school qualification and post-school qualification to obtain a single highest qualification by category of attainment.

For classification see Aria.

Individual home ownership indicates whether or not a person aged 15 years and over owns (or partly owns) the dwelling they usually live in or holds the dwelling in a family trust.

See the ‘Tenure of household’ definition in Household definitions.

For classification see Aria.

'Identification of Individual's Family Nucleus' is a derived variable that identifies whether a person is part of a family nucleus.

A family nucleus comprises a couple with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) whose usual residence is in the same household; the children do not have partners or children of their own living in that household.

Included are people who were absent on census night but usually live in a particular dwelling and are members of a family nucleus in that dwelling, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form or the household summary page.

See also ‘Absentee’, ‘Usual residents’, and ‘Usual residents in private dwellings’ in Individual definitions.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Sources of personal income identifies all the various sources from which a person aged 15 years and over received income in the 12 months ending 6 March 2018.

In the census it is generally only realistic to collect information on money income. This is income that a person can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one’s labour, entrepreneurial skills, and assets; and from transfers received. So, the concept of money income relies on identifying its sources.

Excluded are income in kind, unrealised income, and contingent income (contingent income depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example, to sue). Excluded also is money received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings, and receiving repayments of loan principal; and tax credits and reimbursements of expenses.

The sources of income are also available for each separate field in the classification eg as a 'yes' or 'no' response to 'Wages, salary, commissions, bonuses etc paid by my employer'.

For classification see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Sources of personal income identifies all the various sources from which a person aged 15 years and over received income in the 12 months ending 6 March 2018.

In the census it is generally only realistic to collect information on money income. This is income that a person can normally recall or can readily retrieve from their financial records. Money income is money flow from the deployment of one’s labour, entrepreneurial skills, and assets; and from transfers received. So, the concept of money income relies on identifying its sources.

Excluded are income in kind, unrealised income, and contingent income (contingent income depends on the unknown outcome of a course of action, for example, to sue). Excluded also is money received by borrowing, making withdrawals from savings, and receiving repayments of loan principal; and tax credits and reimbursements of expenses.

For classification see Aria.

Industry is the type of activity undertaken by the organisation, enterprise, business, or unit of economic activity that employs one or more people aged 15 years and over.

For full classification with levels 1-4 see Aria.

A job is a set of tasks performed or designed to be performed by one person in employment (including self-employment) in return for payment or profit.

For classification see Aria.

Job search methods are all the methods used by a person aged 15 years and over to look for paid work in the four weeks before the census. They include:

  • looking at job advertisements
  • writing, phoning, sending email, or applying in person to an employer
  • contacting Work and Income New Zealand to look for a job
  • contacting friends or relatives for help in finding a job
  • contacting a career adviser or a vocational guidance officer
  • other methods that might result in finding a job, for example:
    • contacting a private employment agency
    • placing advertisements to find a job
    • taking steps to set up a business.

The job search methods are also available for each separate field in the classification eg as a 'yes' or 'no' response to 'Contacted Work and Income to Look for a Job'.

See the ‘Actively seeking work’ definition in Individual definitions.

For classification see Aria.

All language codes are combined with a ';' as divider. Language codes are at level four of the classification, the first character of the number denotes the major language group.

Language spoken provides information on which languages, and how many, a person can speak or use.

This includes New Zealand Sign Language.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

Stats NZ has used alternative data sources for missing census responses and responses that could not be classified or did not provide the type of information asked for. We used responses from the 2018 Census, 2013 Census, administrative data, and imputation.

For full classification with levels 1-2 see Aria.

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